Welcome to British Orienteering

Orienteering is an exciting and challenging outdoor sport that exercises both mind and body. The aim is to navigate between control points marked on an orienteering map; as a competitive sport the challenge is to complete the course in the quickest time choosing your own best route; as a recreational activity it does not matter how young, old or fit you are, as you can run or walk making progress at your own pace on the courses planned to suit you.

Orienteering can take place anywhere from remote forest and countryside to urban areas, parks and school playgrounds. Orienteering is a fulfilling sport for runners and walkers of all ages who want to test themselves mentally as well as physically or who want to add variety to their leisure activities. Read More

 

Brand new orienteering courses launched at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

                      

Working together British Orienteering and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park have launched new permanent orienteering courses in the Park.

The launch follows the success of the British Sprint Championships 2016 held for the first time at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park on Saturday 11 June 2016.  The Championships provided an excellent day of competitive orienteering and the launch of the permanent orienteering courses will help create a long lasting legacy.

Chief Executive, Mike Hamilton, at British Orienteering, said: “We are very excited to have launched brand new permanent orienteering courses at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.  Our aim is to raise the profile of the sport of orienteering and encourage families living in the community or travelling to Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park to have a go at orienteering.”   

Orienteering combines running and navigation and offers a great way for families to get out and explore their local parks in a whole new way, adding value to a walk and regular check points to keep the children motivated.

Great Britain’s International Orienteer, Alice Leake, was on hand to explain some of the finer points of orienteering and inspire a group of local school children to get started on the new course in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.     

 

Layla Conway, Head of Business and Communities at the London Legacy Development Corporation, said: “It is great news that there will be a British Orienteering course for everyone to enjoy at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. It is a fun and free activity for school groups and families to enjoy so that they can explore and discover the Park. What’s more, it is for everyone, even if you haven’t been orienteering before. It’s a great way to stay active and progress at your own pace and enjoy the wonderful Parklands.”

Permanent orienteering courses are a great way to get active outdoors and go orienteering at a time and place that suits you. The courses offer a huge amount of variety, from urban courses in city centres to rural routes through beautiful scenery. Permanent Orienteering Courses can be found across the UK and can be accessed from your doorstep or further afield helping you to discover new places.  No matter what your level of experience and fitness is there are courses that will suit you. 

To access a film about permanent orienteering courses – click here.

To find permanent orienteering courses on our new portal go to: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/pocs.  Select a venue before collecting your map and off you go! It is as easy as that.

To find out more about the orienteering courses in the Park, visit:  www.britishorienteering.org.uk/poc/qe-olympic-park

To find out more about the sport of orienteering visit:  www.britishorienteering.org.uk


Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager
 

 

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Kingswood Colomendy becomes British Orienteering’s latest Recognised Centre



Kingswood Colomendy has been recognised by British Orienteering, the National Governing body for the sport of orienteering as providing high quality orienteering experiences to visiting groups.   Kingswood Colomendy is one of many recently accredited centres awarded British Orienteering Recognised Centre status.

Sam Crocker, Training Co-ordinator from Kingswood Colomendy, said:  “Orienteering is a valued part of our programme and it is a great complement to both our environmental and outdoor and adventurous programmes.  Our 130-acre site is perfect for both beginners and more experienced orienteers and we look forward to building on our already strong relationship with the orienteering community.”

Dan Riley, National Participation Manager, said: “Our Recognised Centre scheme is designed to work with Outdoor Centres to understand how orienteering is used to deliver a wide variety of educational outcomes. We are pleased to recognise Kingswood Colomendy as delivering a positive experience to visiting groups.”
    

Recognised Centre Status is awarded to Outdoor Centres who can show a consistently high standard of orienteering across a range of criteria that covers orienteering delivery, staffing, resourcing as well as policies and procedures. These are examined in detail by British Orienteering advisors and outdoor centres only become recognised if they meet these standards.

British Orienteering, the National Governing Body of the sport, provide specialist advisors to help Outdoor Centres across the country to provide the highest standards in orienteering delivery.  

As part of the Recognised Centre scheme, British Orienteering provides approved outdoor centres with: 

  • A Recognised Centre plaque to display at their centre which confirms that the National Governing Body of the sport of orienteering is satisfied with the standards in orienteering being delivered by the centre

  • Use of the British Orienteering Recognised Centre logo on all their correspondence

  • A high profile listing on the British Orienteering website

  • Opportunities to host British Orienteering workshops, training courses and camps

  • On-going access to a wealth of orienteering knowledge and expertise.

British Orienteering, the National Governing Body for orienteering in the United Kingdom, launched their Recognised Centre scheme in 2015. The scheme aims to raise the profile of orienteering within the outdoor industry and recognise positive orienteering experiences being provided by centres across the country.

For more information about the scheme and how to join, visit the dedicated Recognised Centre section on the British Orienteering website. 

For more information about Kingswood Colomendy Outdoor Centre, visit: www.kingswood.co.uk

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager.

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Kris Jones doubles up as Lucy Butt seals maiden title

                      

The location for the 2005 World Cup Middle Distance race, competitors would face a great contrast between technical mine-works and fast runnable forest, interspersed with rhododendron and holly bushes, forcing runners to find a fine balance between full-paced running and keeping in contact with the map; the perfect combination for a Middle distance race.

The rain which had engulfed the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park at the Sprint Finals had returned and it was a drizzly morning which runners were faced with as they arrived at the assembly field. It would be tough conditions out in the forest, with the banks of the mine-works churning up under the persistent flow of runners.

As the early starters began to enter the finish arena to give an indication of a possible winning time, it was evident that this would not be a simple race. Many on both the Men’s and Women’s courses struggling to break 10min/km pace, despite it being a relatively short Middle distance course at only 5.5km and 4.5km respectively. This was clearly a technical challenge of the highest calibre. The seniors would have to watch out for the junior elite as well with both the M/W 18’s and 20’s running the same courses as the Elite field.

The Women’s race was an extremely close fought contest, with the times slowly creeping down below the 50-minute mark as the later starters began arriving in the finish after tackling a brutal run-in up a muddy, cultivated field (into a head-wind no less). The juniors would not replicate Fiona Bunn’s race at the sprints on Saturday, with Helen Ockendon (SROC) the closest to challenging the Elite women, taking the Junior title in a time of 43.38. The first senior woman to challenge the 40-minute barrier was ex-GB international Rachael Rothman (SYO) –  who had competed at the World Cup Middle distance race on Leith Hill in 2005 and clearly knew what it would take today – posting a time of 39.59 at the finish. Her time would be closely tested by her teammate, and current British Long Distance Champion, Kim Baxter (SYO) who would fall just shy of Rothman’s mark in a time of 40.21. However, the best was yet to come, in the form of Lucy Butt (SARUM). Starting just 2minutes behind Baxter, Butt caught her 2-minute woman, coming in to a clear winning margin in a time of 38.03, the fastest of the day. She would be challenged by the FVO duo of Anastasia Trubkina and Fanni Gyurko, who would surpass Rothman’s time but only just, coming in at 39.37 and 39.21 respectively – though they were ineligible for the final podium. But neither could do enough to displace Lucy Butt from the top-step of the podium and sealing a maiden senior British title.

The Men’s race was an equally tight affair. The early starters would struggle to break the 50-minute barrier, with GB team coach Edward Nicholas (AROS) posting an early time of 45.33 to be one of the only in the first block to do so. Nicholas would hold onto 1st until the last Junior Elites began arriving into the finish, firstly in the form of Andrew Barr (EUOC) would be the first to go below 40 minutes, in 39.20. Barr would be just pipped to the post by Joe Woodley (ShUOC), who would win the junior title in 39.05. These times would stand until the very final Elite starters began to enter the arena. Peter Bray (SN) would be the first to challenge in a time of 39.15 (good enough for 8th on the day) before being eclipsed by Peter Hodkinson (NOC), who dropped the winning time still further to 37.29; but still two-minutes shy of the predicted winning time of 35-minutes. The crowd did not have to wait long before this mark would be bettered, with the Saturday’s Sprint Champion Kris Jones (SBOC) demolishing Hodkinson’s time to take what seemed an insurmountable lead in 34.09. It was only British Long Distance Champion Graham Gristwood (FVO) who was left in the forest who could attempt to knock Jones out of contention for his second gold medal in as many days. It was not to be, with Gristwood falling just shy and having to settle for 2nd place in a time of 34.17. The final drama was still to come, with Alasdair McLeod (CLYDE) piping Hodkinson for 3rd place by a mere 5-seconds, in 37.24, to take his second podium of the weekend.

Thank you to the organisers for what was a fantastic event, the courses clearly provided the challenge necessary to crown a worthy champion.

Full provisional results for the British Middle Distance Championships can be found here

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager on behalf of William Gardner (SHUOC)

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Charlotte Ward retains as Kris Jones reclaims

 

      

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park provided the perfect back drop to the blue-ribbon British Sprint Orienteering Championships event.  It was not the classic urban or university campus terrain typically faced by competitors.  Runners were instead faced with intricate landscape gardens interworked with steep-banked climbs and long route choice legs to keep competitors guessing.

The day started out with a slight hitch, with starts delayed by twenty minutes with technical difficulties, adding to the tense nature of such an event. With only 6 to qualify from each of the three heats, it was all to play for. Though some could afford to take it easy, almost certain of their qualification, it would be a tough scrap for many; A final qualification would come down to seconds.

The qualification began with a blast around the 2012 Olympic village, but there was no rest for runners as courses were planned to be fast from the off, leaving competitors with a choice of forcing a fast pace at the start and the risk of blowing up or risking missing qualification by starting too slowly and never gaining the time back. This fast pace didn’t seem to everyone’s liking though, with nearly 60 runners being disqualified for crossing out of bounds, their fine navigation clearly suffering under the fast pace. For the Elite though, the qualification seemed almost straight forward. The final three start blocks of each heat of the men all qualified, with three previous champions in Kris Jones (FVO), Chris Smithard (DEE), and defending champion Murray Strain (INT), making his long awaited elite comeback after WOC 2015, all qualifying for the final. The surprise of the heats may have been Jamie Parkinson (OUOC), qualifying fastest of heat 1 by a massive 30 second margin.

In the Women’s elite, defending champion Charlotte Ward (HALO) was the clear winner of heat 1, but she would face stiff competition. Not only was previous champion Tessa Strain (EUOC) on the comeback trail, but there was stiff international competition in the shape of Laura Robertson (ESOC), winning heat 3. The heats also saw a break-through performance from W18 Fiona Bunn (TVOC), winning heat 2 by a clear 13 seconds over Alice Leake (SN), placing another name into the fray to fight for victory in the finals.

The rosy start to the day began to turn over the break between the heats and the finals. As the competitors waited the clouds gathered, and the forecast rain which had held off over the morning finally arrived. As the gargantuan rain drops, more like golf balls than water, hammered down on the assembly, the finals arrived. The sudden rain had dramatically changed the nature of the finals. Though sections of the park had tracked up during the mornings heats, the rain had begun to churn the ground up on the slippery banks of the Park – runners would have to work hard to avoid the river, and washing out of contention. As expected with the heat winners starting last, the pace increased throughout the finals, but these courses were a different beast to the qualifiers. Starting next to the Aquatics Centre, the competitors dealt with tricky underpass sections and wide route-choice options before heading to the Olympic Stadium itself. In the shadow of the stadium the runners passed through intricate gardens of the park, negotiating their way over the river before heading back over the park to the arena, in the shadow of the Park’s Olympic rings and a final uphill slog before negotiating a slippery drop to the final control. This was no Usain Bolt showpiece sprint, but a battle against nature itself.

Smithard was the first to break the 16-minute barrier for the men, clocking 15.05, a time that would stand until eventually eclipsed by Alasdair McLeod (CLYDE) by a mere 5 seconds. Only five men were left to take the crown from McLeod and it would take until the final starter, Jones, to do this. The arena was tense due to the lack of timing information – with the commentators relying on the old-fashioned stopwatch due to a technical failure – no-one was quite sure of the exact timings. But Jones had won by a clear 18 seconds, retaking the title he had sealed in 2013.

In the Women’s final it was a much tighter affair, with a mere two seconds separating the podium places. The first to finish was Fanni Gyurko (FVO), setting a blistering 16.34. Tessa Strain was next to challenge but could not surmount the time, finishing 14 seconds down. Bunn presented the largest threat to Gyurko’s lead first, coming in an agonising 1 second down at the finish in her first Elite sprint final. It was Charlotte Ward though, who would eventual surpass Gyurko, taking victory by a single second, and retaining the title she had won last year.

Thank you to the organisers for a fantastic event, a great setting and some excellent courses.

Provisional results from the British Sprints Championships can be found here.

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager on behalf of William Gardner (SHUOC)

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British Sprint and British Middle Championships 2016 this weekend!

The British Sprint Championships and British Middle Championships 2016 take place this weekend!   

For the very first time the British Sprint Championships will be hosted at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London tomorrow (Saturday 11 June 2016).  The following day (Sunday 12 June), the British Middle Orienteering Championships will take place further south on Leith Hill near Dorking. 

Organised by British Orienteering, Southeast Orienteering Association and Chigwell and Epping Forest Orienteering Club.  Both events form part of the UK Orienteering League and promise excellent running and navigation. 

For further information about the events and travel directions please visit: http://www.britishsprintchamps.org.uk/ and http://www.britishmiddlechamps.org.uk/

British Orienteering wishes all competitors and spectators a fantastic weekend of orienteering!
 


Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager

 

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British Orienteering Championships set for the buzz of Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park!

The British Orienteering Championship season heads off to Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park on Saturday 11 June 2016 for the first day of a Championship weekend which starts with the British Sprints. 

Organised by British Orienteering, Southeast Orienteering Association and Chigwell and Epping Forest Orienteering Club, the British Sprint Championships will be hosted for the very first time at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London.  The event promises an excellent day of running and navigation. 

The following day, Sunday 12 June, orienteers will head further south to Surrey for the British Middle Orienteering Championships which will take place on Leith Hill near Dorking. 

Orienteers from across the UK will have the opportunity to run through a variety of terrain at both venues and at the end of each day of competition worthy British Champions will be crowned.

Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager, at British Orienteering, said: “Our aim is to raise the profile of the sport of orienteering. We are very excited to be holding our British Sprint Championships this year in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.  We welcome spectators to this event and we will be providing the Xplorer Challenge for newcomers to the sport to have a go for themselves.”

David Goldstone, Chief Executive, London Legacy Development Corporation, said: “With 560 acres of beautiful parklands, what better place to hold this prestigious event than Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park? It’s great that the British Orienteering Championships are coming to the Park for the first time. Orienteering is an excellent challenge for the mind and body, and I’m sure all participants will have a fantastic day.”

Both events offer great activities in which the whole family can be involved.  British Orienteering encourages everyone to come along and have a go!  At the British Middle Championships there will be beginners’ colour-coded courses ranging from very easy ones following paths, to others requiring the basic use of a compass. All these will be suitable for individuals and family groups. Also available at Leith Hill will be string courses for very young children on their own, or together with their parents, grandparents or guardians. They will have their own map and follow a string which takes them around a set of controls marked by fun characters. 

The Xplorer Challenge, which will be at both events, will provide a fun family challenge aimed at primary and pre-school children. Using a simple map the aim is to find the points marked on it, and write down the name of the secret animal or colour shown on each marker on the ground. No experience of map reading is necessary and parents are encouraged to join in the fun! 

For further information about the event and travel directions to either location please visit: http://www.britishsprintchamps.org.uk/ and http://www.britishmiddlechamps.org.uk/

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager

 

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World Orienteering Championships Selection Announcement

 

 

 

We are pleased to announce selection for the 2016 GB team for the World Orienteering Championships in Strömstad, Sweden 20th – 28th August. See below for selected athletes and the disciplines they have been selected for:

 

 

 

 

Individual Sprint

Men

Women

Peter Hodkinson (NOC)

Kris Jones (FVO)

Ralph Street (SLOW)

Alice Leake (SN)

Jo Shepherd (INVOC)

Charlotte Ward (HALO)

 

Mixed Sprint Relay

Peter Hodkinson (NOC)

Kris Jones (FVO)

Cat Taylor (CLOK)

Charlotte Ward (HALO)

 

Middle

Men

Women

Graham Gristwood (FVO)

Hector Haines (INT)

Ralph Street (SLOW)

 

Hollie Orr (LOC)

Cat Taylor (CLOK)

Jess Tullie (BASOC)

 

 

Long

Men

Women

Alan Cherry (EBOR)

Hector Haines (INT)

Alasdair McLeod (subject to fitness) (CLYDE)

Reserve: Matt Speake (EBOR)

Hollie Orr (LOC)

Cat Taylor (CLOK)

Jo Shepherd (INVOC)

Reserve: Charlotte Watson (EUOC)

 

Forest Relay

Men

Women

Graham Gristwood (FVO)

Kris Jones (FVO)

Ralph Street (SLOW)

Hollie Orr (LOC)

Cat Taylor (CLOK)

Jess Tullie (BASOC)

 

“The athletes selected into the Great Britain team, for the 2016 World Orienteering Championships, have demonstrated that they have the drive and desire along with the ability to deliver top performances in Sweden at the end of August. We have a great blend of experienced athletes and newcomers in this team and the coaches and team managers are looking forward to continuing their work with them in preparing for what is the most important senior event on the calendar,” said Jackie Newton, Performance Manager.

Adding, “it is exciting to see how many opportunities the selected team has for top performances right across the range of individual disciplines, and also to sense the strong feeling amongst the athletes and staff that there is strong potential in all three relays, and particularly the men’s forest relay after coming so close to a medal last year and where we have selected a team that will be strong and rested."

Congratulations to all selected athletes and their personal coaches, in particular WOC debutants: Alan Cherry, Peter Hodkinson and Jo Shepherd.

 

Item posted by Jackie Newton, Talent and Performance Manager.

 

 

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European Orienteering Championships - Relay

The final day of the European Orienteering Championships saw the forest Relay take place at Cerna Voda (the Black Water) – from the same arena as the Middle Final yesterday writes Liz Campbell. 

The organisers had thought carefully about the layout and it was a big bonus for athletes waiting in quarantine to be able to not only listen to the commentary but also see their incoming runners pass through the spectator controls. 

In the men’s relay the first leg saw Hector Haines just pip Kris Jones  to the finish, 90 seconds down on the lead.  Kris lost some time on control 6 but then ran confidently through the rocky green section to meet  Hector’s  gaffle for the last part of the course. Second leg for the 2nd team was Peter Hodkinson, who started out with Baptiste Rollier and hung with the Swiss 2nd team to pull through to near the lead. Peter just lost the back of the Swiss though on the final gaffle with a small mistake but still handed over in 6th. Ralph Street made small errors and set Graham Gristwood out on last leg with around 3 minutes to the leaders.  Alan (pictured), tired after four races, started just behind a strong pack  and had to run his own race.  Graham missed in the green ( at a controversial control) both our men’s teams ended up finishing together, some 6 mins behind the winners, in 11th and 12th (9th Nation).

Jess Tullie and Jo Shepherd  took the two first legs in the women’s  relay and both had a strong starts.  Jo missed in the green and lost some minutes but Jess managed to keep a steady pace and came in just over two minutes down.  Cat set of strongly and managed to overtake a few teams  but sadly the dream finish was not to be as she failed to punch a control near the end.  Hollie started well, missed her control in the green but was still in sight of 6th place when she was pulled out of the race.  Meanwhile our second team girls fought all the way to the finish with Kirsten Strain running second leg and Alice Leake the anchor leg.

There were exciting sprint finishes in both relays with the Swiss 2nd team taking the men’s title and a surprise win for the Finnish 1st team in the women’s race.  Full results can be found here.

Picture credit - Dave Rollins

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European Orienteering Championships - Middle Final

Mramorovy, Cerna Voda was the scene of today's middle distance final writes Jess Tullie. Great Britain had four athletes lining up in the A final after yesterday's tough qualification race.

The B finalists started first and because tomorrow's relay is in the same area, adopted a number of different strategies.  Fresh legs will be beneficial. Alice  Leake has thankfully recovered well from yesterday's bump and came back with a smile on her face and excited for tomorrow. If Kirsten Strain had a choice, it would be the JK's snow instead of the heat of Czech Republic, but she knows that you have to learn to race in all conditions and she got on with it. She's looking forward to running 2nd leg tomorrow (thankfully a cooler forecast). Hector Haines and Matt Speake put in mean performances to both finish in the top five whilst Jonny Crickmore wasn't far behind, pleased to improve on yesterday. Peter Hodkinson ran a steady race, mixed in with faster sections to prepare for tomorrow.

After a five hour wait in quarantine, the A finalists got down to business. Dave Rollins did a great job of keeping the athletes happy, telling funny jokes and generally being cheerful (athough thankfully didn't carry through with his threat of tickling athletes that were looking grumpy). He has had a lot to put up with in quarantine this week, ranging from chatterboxes to those who prefer a quiet corner.

 
Picture left - Cat Taylor relaxing in quarantine

 

 

 

Liz Campbell greeted the athletes at the pre-start and made sure all were ready to race.

The boys were off first and Alan Cherry was ready for a strong race after such a brave performance yesterday. After finishing, Alan said, "It was tricky and tough underfoot and I was feeling very tired from the previous days of racing. I made a few too many small, messy mistakes to get the result I was hoping for. It was great fun running into the noisy arena, where kids kept out of mischief by running alongside the run-in with us."

Jess Tullie had a tough day in the forest. She got into a muddle at the beginning, making it impossible to achieve the run she wanted but is determined to bounce back tomorrow.

Jo Shepherd's (pictured right) plan of no nonsense and keep cool paid off today. She remarked, "I rushed into the course and lost some time at the first control, but pulled myself together and had a good race after this. Delighted to finish in 30th." Two top 30 results in the European Champs is quite an achievement!

Cat Taylor was our top performer today, finishing in 15th and said, "After a topsy turvey start to the year, I'm happy to get my first international of the year under my belt. A perfect first step to my comeback after injury."

The team are in good spirits and ready to race hard in tomorrow's relay. If there's anything to learn from today, it's that there's going to be some tricky controls and low visibility. Plenty of opportunities to orienteer our way to sucess.

Photos thanks to Dave Rollins

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European Orienteering Championships - Middle Qualifier

After a much-needed rest day, Thursday brought the Middle Distance Qualification races on Olovena Stola writes Kirsten Strain

Conditions contrasted with the start of the week, with lower temperatures and low-lying mist but a long walk from quarantine to the start gave opportunity for an extended warm up. The courses were similar to those predicted in the pre-race geeking session, which gave some GB athletes additional confidence.

Qualification in the Men's race proved a tough challenge, with only Alan Cherry reaching the standard. In the words of Hector, who missed qualification by 42 seconds:  "For me, I just misjudged it. It was easier than expected. I spent too much time hesitating and reading the map on approach to controls, when instead I should have maintained a high speed and focussed on flow. Physically I felt full of beans. I should have been more aggressive." Similarly, Peter Hodkinson commented on how playing safe, even making some legs into orange-standard, allowed him to qualify for the Sprint final but was not a tactic that paid off today. Ralph was also below the required pace and didn't get the qualification he wanted. Jonny Crickmore and Matt Speake are also through to the B final, in the esteemed company of Long-distance winner Daniel Hubmann. All of the Swedes qualified as did all the Czech team but none of the Kiwis.

The Women's race provided more opportunities for celebration in the GB camp. Stealing the limelight was Cat Taylor, winning her heat by a peachy 10 seconds. Cat said: "I wasn't very confident with my current form but I kept a level head and decided not to go bananas. I was pleased with the fruits of my labour and I hope that I can have the same result in the final tomorrow." Jess came 8th, 1:44 off the lead. Jess said afterwards that she felt well prepared, finding the course very much as she'd expected and happy that her tactics of safe routes and minimising time in greens paid off. Jo came 13th in her heat, despite a small mistake on number 13, in a soup of green and gullies. Jo and Jess both said they are excited about tomorrow and are pleased to have qualified for A finals twice this week. Kirsten had fun but narrowly missed on qualification, with 19th place, 24 seconds off qualification time. Alice Leake ventured into the forest, missing her usual olive green and buildings. Unfortunately Alice got herself into a bit of a pickle by running off a crag and hurting her back when landing on a rock, but she bravely finished her course to take 25th place. Alice commented: "Ow! Top tip: don't fall off a crag. It hurts." Hollie was still suffering from some niggles that develped on Tuesday and decided not to run the Middle distance but plans to be fresh and strong for the relay.

The Middle distance finals are today at Cerna Voda. The B finals are from 12:30 (CET), the Men's A final starts at 13:45 and the Women's A final starts at 15:30.

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News Headlines

15
Jun

Jukola 2016 on web TV!

World biggest orienteering relay Jukola (18 - 19 June 2016) can now be followed live through an international web TV broadcast.
13
Jun

Kris Jones doubles up as Lucy Butt seals maiden title

Leith Hill was the setting for this year’s British Middle Distance Championships. Runners had to find a fine balance between full-paced running and keeping in contact with the map; the perfect combination for a Middle distance race.

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